Appendix 9: Excerpted SARTCP training agenda

Appendix 9: Excerpted SARTCP training agenda

Below is an excerpt from the SARTCP training agenda that was used for an introductory training session on PREA for line staff.

Objective

Estimated Time

Content Outline and Notes

15 min Introduction

  • Introduction of trainer
  • Introduction of students
  • Housekeeping issues
  • Lesson overview
  • Objectives for the lesson
Define strategies of the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA).
Identify at least three types of sexual assault.Define sexual assault in a confinement setting.
24 min Lesson 1: Basic Sexual Assault Education

PREA Basics/History

  • PREA legislation history
  • PREA strategies
  • Applications, goals, and definitions

Facilitated Discussion:

  • What are your definitions of sexual assault?
  • How do you expect a victim to react to being sexually assaulted?
  • How would you handle it, if someone disclosed to you right now?

Three Types of Sexual Assault:

  • Stranger sexual assault
  • Non-stranger sexual assault
  • Institutional sexual assault

Definitions of Sexual Assault:

  • Inmate-on-inmate sexual assault
  • Staff-on-inmate sexual assault
  • Sexual harassment
  • Definition of vulnerable populations
Describe reactions victims may have. 9 min Reactions of Victims

  • Withdrawal, depression, feelings of guilt
  • Angry, aggressive, combative behavior
  • Overly sexualized
  • Changes in behavior and personality
List differences in sexual assault in a confinement setting. 9 min Three Ways Sexual Assault is Different in Confinement

  • Victim lives with the perpetrator in most cases.
  • It is difficult to access services confidentially.
  • Victim must worry about retaliation from others.
List service options for victims/ survivors. 8 min Typical Services Available for Sexual Assault Victims/Survivors

  • Hotline
  • Information and referral
  • Individual and group counseling
  • Medical and legal advocacy and accompaniment

Facilitated Discussion:

  • What services can be provided in the institutional setting? What services cannot be provided?
Identify the importance of trauma-informed reactions to disclosures.

Discuss the importance of words and physical response to a disclosure.

8 min Lesson 2: First Responder Duties

Trauma-Informed Response

  • Victims need to know that they are believed.
  • Knowledge is powerful for victims/survivors. It is important for them to know what is going to happen for reporting.
  • Who will they talk to?
  • Where will they go?
  • What is the process?

Physical Reaction to a Disclosure

  • Try to stay relaxed.
  • Don’t appear to close yourself off from the victim/survivor; for example, do not fold your arms in front of your chest.
  • Don’t step back from the victim.

Importance of Choice of Words

  • Do not make victim-blaming statements/questions.
  • “What were you doing with that loser?”
  • “You should know better than to trust him/her.”
  • “What did you think would happen if you were acting that way?”
  • Intonation should be a normal conversational tone; no yelling or raising your voice.
Identify responsibilities when a disclosure is received.

Identify follow-up responsibilities to a disclosure.

12 min Adult Rehabilitation Center Staff Section

Basic Responsibilities When Receiving an Immediate Disclosure (within the past seven days)

  • Separate the victim and the perpetrator by taking them to separate locations.
  • Determine whether there is any immediate medical need. If so, contact 911.
  • Ask basic questions:
  • Are you hurt?
  • Where did this happen?
  • Who did this?
  • When did this happen?
  • Talk to the victim/survivor about not doing the following actions that could destroy possible evidence:
  • washing
  • brushing teeth
  • changing clothes
  • urinating
  • defecating
  • smoking
  • drinking
  • eating

Responsibilities When Receiving a Delayed Disclosure (more than seven days ago)

  • Separate the victim and the perpetrator by taking them to separate locations, if applicable.
  • Notify the shift supervisor.

It is important to review all six flowcharts. Each one is different, depending on who the alleged perpetrator is.

Follow-up with the Victim/Survivor

  • The victim/survivor chose you to disclose to and it is important to acknowledge that.
  • It is important to remind victims that there is help for them.
Identify responsibilities when a disclosure is received.

Identify follow-up responsibilities to a disclosure.

12 min Juvenile Detention Center Staff Section

Responsibilities When Receiving an Immediate Disclosure (within the past seven days)

  • Separate the victim and the perpetrator by taking them to separate locations.
  • Determine whether there is any immediate medical need.
  • If so, contact 911 and call Code Green and make a report to DCF (child protection agency).
  • Ask basic questions:
  • Are you hurt?
  • Where did this happen?
  • Who did this?
  • When did this happen?
  • If the incident occurred within the past seven days, the first responder should talk to the victim/survivor about not doing the following actions that could destroy possible evidence:
  • washing
  • brushing teeth
  • changing clothes
  • urinating
  • defecating
  • smoking
  • drinking
  • eating

Responsibilities When Receiving a Delayed Disclosure (more than seven days ago)

  • Separate the victim and the perpetrator by taking them to separate locations.
  • Notify the shift supervisor.
  • Make a report to DCF (child protection agency).

Follow-up with the Victim/Survivor

  • The victim/survivor chose you to disclose to and so it is important to acknowledge that.
  • It is important to remind victims that there is help for them.
Describe confidentiality in the adult setting.

Discuss appropriate actions to take with regard to confidentiality.

20 min Lesson 3:  Confidentiality in the Adult Setting

Confidentiality

  • No matter who the alleged perpetrator is, it is important that as few people as possible become aware of the details.
  • Be clear with the alleged victim/survivor about what you as a staff member are required to report and who you are required to report to.
  • Thank you so much for trusting me to tell me about this. I am required to report this, but I will not talk about this with anyone other than the people I am required to report this to.
    (Indicate the types of people who must be notified.)
  • It is important to understand the confidentiality policies of the victim service provider that may come into the facility or that the inmate may go to see in the community.

Facilitated Discussion:

  • What are the differences in the confidentiality policy of the DOC and that of the victim service provider?
  • How could these two policies/philosophies clash?
  • How would you handle that?
Describe confidentiality in the juvenile setting.

Discuss appropriate actions to take with regard to confidentiality.

20 min Lesson 3:  Confidentiality in the Juvenile Setting

Confidentiality

  • No matter who the alleged perpetrator is, it is important that as few people as possible become aware of the details.
  • Be clear with the alleged victim/survivor about what you as a staff member are required to report and who you are required to report to.
  • Thank you so much for trusting me to tell me about this. I am required to report this, but I will not talk about this with anyone other than the people I am required to report this to.
    (Indicate the types of people who must be notified.)
  • It is important to understand the confidentiality policies of the victim service provider that may come into the facility or that the inmate may go to see in the community.
  • Know the differences for those over and under the age of 14 when it comes to the services a victim service provider can offer. (Note: This varies from state-to-state.)

Facilitated Discussion:

  • What are the differences in the confidentiality policy of the DOC and that of the victim service provider?
  • How could these two policies/philosophies clash?
  • How would you handle that?
Identify the positions/people who are likely to be disclosed to. 7 min Lesson 4:  Internal Reporting Options

Facilitated Discussion:

  • What staff positions do you think victims/survivors might be likely to report to?
  • Why do you think so? What makes that position/person one who may be reported to?
Identify methods residents can use to report internally.

Identify how residents are informed of these options.

8 min Internal Reporting Options – Adult Facility

Methods of Reporting:

  • Report to a staff member verbally.
  • Report by filling out an Informal Communication Form and putting it in the secure box.

Notification of Reporting Methods

  • ARC handbook
    Identify methods residents can use to report internally.

Identify how residents are informed of these options.

8 min Internal Reporting Options – Juvenile Facility

Methods of Reporting:

  • Report to a staff member verbally.
  • Report by filling out an Informal Communication Form and putting it in the secure box.

Notification of Reporting Methods

  • JDC handbook
Identify methods residents can use to report externally.
Identify how residents are informed of these options.
20 min Lesson 5: External Reporting Options – Adult Setting

Methods of reporting:

  • Olathe Police Department
  • Johnson County Sheriff’s Department

Notification of reporting methods

  • ARC handbook
  • DOC website
    Identify methods residents can use to report externally.

Identify how residents are informed of these options.

20 min Lesson 5: External Reporting Options – Juvenile Setting)

Methods of Reporting:

  • KDHE (health department)
  • Kansas Child Abuse Hotline/Kansas Protection Report Center
  • Olathe School personnel

Notification of Reporting Methods

  • JDC handbook
  • DOC website
Identify reasons victims/ survivors don’t report.

Identify additional barriers incarcerated victims have to not report.

20 min Lesson 6: Fears/Concerns About Reporting

Reasons Victims Do Not Report

  • fear that no one will believe them
  • fear that they will lose friends and/or loved ones
  • fear that no one will understand
  • fear that no one else has to deal with this

Additional Barriers that Incarcerated Victims Face

  • retaliation from other inmates
  • retaliation from staff members
Identify orientations of LGBTQI residents.

Identify risks relating to sexual assault for this population.

20 min Lesson 7:  Working with LGBTQI residents

Definitions of LGBTQI Orientations

  • Lesbian/gay
  • Bisexual
  • Transgender
  • Questioning/queer
  • Intersex

Risk Factors for This Population in a Facility Setting

  • often a more vulnerable segment of inmate population
  • sometimes more feminine in appearance and demeanor
  • often considered a potential threat by other inmates, staff, or both
  • often perceived as a molester, whether true or not, by other inmates, staff, or both
  • often a potential target for physical and psychological abuse by other inmates, staff, or both
Identify retaliation methods used in a facility setting.

Identify potential perpetrators.

15 min Lesson 8: Protecting Victims from Retaliation

Retaliation Methods

  • physical abuse
  • verbal harassment
  • psychological abuse
  • repeat victimization

Potential Perpetrators

  • friends of the accused perpetrator on the inside
  • friends or relatives of the accused perpetrator on the outside
  • “head” inmate of the unit and/or block
  • staff members
30 min Conclusion

  • Summary review of information covered in this lesson
  • Q and A session to check learning
  • Lesson wrap-up/summary
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